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Old 05-19-2010, 08:14 AM   #1
ASSESTYTEAH

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Default Are the kassites the ancestors of the Agazians
The Kassites were an ancient Near Eastern tribe who gained control of Babylonia after the fall of the Old Babylonian Empire after ca. 1531 BC to ca. 1155 BC (short chronology). Their language is classified as an isolate.
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* 1 History
o 1.1 Kassite Dynasty of Babylon
* 2 Social life
* 3 Language
* 4 Culture
* 5 References
* 6 See also
* 7 External links

[edit] History

The original homeland of the Kassites is obscure, but appears to have been located in the Zagros Mountains in Lorestan in Iran.[1][2] Their first historical appearance occurred in the 18th century BC when they attacked Babylonia in the 9th year of the reign of Samsu-Iluna (reigned ca. 1686 – 1648 BC (short)), the son of Hammurabi. Samsu-Iluna repelled them, but they subsequently gained control of northern Babylonia sometime after the fall of Babylon to the Hittites in ca. 1531 BC (short), and conquered the southern part of the kingdom by ca. 1475 BC. The Hittites had carried off the idol of the god Marduk, but the Kassite rulers regained possession, returned Marduk to Babylon, and made him the equal of the Kassite Shuqamuna. The circumstances of their rise to power are unknown, due to a lack of documentation from this so-called "Dark Age" period of widespread dislocation. No inscription or document in the Kassite language has been preserved, an absence that cannot be purely accidental, suggesting a severe regression of literacy in official circles. Babylon under Kassite rulers, who renamed the city Karanduniash, re-emerged as a political and military power in the ancient Near East. A newly built capital city Dur-Kurigalzu was named in honour of Kurigalzu I (ca. early 14th century BC). His successors Kadashman-Enlil I (ca. 1374 – 1360 BC (short)) and Burnaburiash II (ca. 1359 – 1333 BC [short chronology]{short}) were in correspondence with the Egyptian rulers Amenhotep III and Akhenaton (Amenhotep IV) (see Amarna letters). Their success was built upon the relative political stability that the Kassite monarchs achieved. They ruled Babylonia practically without interruption for almost four hundred years— the longest rule by any dynasty in Babylonian history. Even after a minor revolt ca. 1333 BC and a seven-year hiatus of Assyrian rule (ca. 1224 - 1217 BC (short)), the ruling Kassite family regained the throne.

The transformation of southern Mesopotamia into a territorial state, rather than a network of allied or combatative temple-cities, made Babylonia an international power. Kassite kings established trade and diplomacy with Assyria, Egypt, Elam, and the Hittites, and the Kassite royal house intermarried with their royal families. There were foreign merchants in Babylon and other cities, and Babylonian merchants were active from Egypt (a major source of Nubian gold) to Assyria and Anatolia. Kassite weights and seals, the packet-identifying and measuring tools of commerce, have been found in as far afield as Thebes in Greece, in southern Armenia, and even in a shipwreck off the southern coast of today's Turkey.

The Kassite kings maintained control of their realm through a network of provinces administered by governors. Almost equal with the royal cities of Babylon and Dur-Kurigalzu, the revived city of Nippur was the most important provincial center. Nippur, the formerly great city, which had been virtually abandoned ca. 1730 BC, was rebuilt in the Kassite period, with temples meticulously re-built on their old foundations. In fact, under the Kassite government, the governor of Nippur, who took the Sumerian-derived title of Guennakku, ruled as a sort of secondary and lesser king. The prestige of Nippur was enough for a series of 13th century BC Kassite kings to reassume the title 'governor of Nippur' for themselves.

Other important centers during the Kassite period were Larsa, Sippar and Susa. After the Kassite dynasty was overthrown in 1155 BC, the system of provincial administration continued and the country remained united under the succeeding rule, the Second Dynasty of Isin.

Documentation of the Kassite period depends heavily on the scattered and disarticulated tablets from Nippur, where thousands of tablets and fragments have been excavated. They include administrative and legal texts, letters, seal inscriptions, kudurrus (land grants and administrative regulations), private votive inscriptions, and even a literary text (usually identified as a fragment of a historical epic).

"Kassite rulers in Babylon were also scrupulous to follow existing forms of expression, and the public and private patterns of behavior "and even went beyond that — as zealous neophytes do, or outsiders, who take up a superior civilization — by favoring an extremely conservative attitude, at least in palace circles." (Oppenheim 1964, p. 62). Over the centuries, however, the Kassites were absorbed into the Babylonian population. Eight among the last kings of the Kassite dynasty have Akkadian names, Kudur-Enlil's name is part Elamite and part Sumerian and Kassite princesses married into the royal family of Assyria.

The Book of Judges in the Hebrew Bible contains a reference to what appears to be a Kassite ruler, who is named as Cushan-Rishathaim and described as ruler of "Aram Naharaim". "Cushan" is interpreted by Biblical scholars to mean "Kassite" and "Aram Naharaim" to mean northwest Mesopotamia. According to Judges, Cushan-Rishathaim conquered Israel shortly after the death of Joshua and held it for eight years.

The Elamites conquered Babylonia in the 12th century BC, thus ending the Kassite state. The last Kassite king, Enlil-nadin-ahi, was taken to Susa and imprisoned there, where he also died.

However, Kassites survived as a distinct ethnic group in the mountains of Lorestan long after the Kassite state collapsed.

Babylonian records describe how Sennacherib on his Iranian campaign of 702 BC subdued some Kassites in a battle near Hulwan, Iran.

Herodotus and other ancient Greek writers sometimes referred to the region around Susa as "Cissia", a variant of the Kassite name. However, it is not clear if Kassites were actually living in that region so late.

Herodotus was almost certainly referring to Kassites when he described "Asiatic Ethiopians" in the Persian army that invaded Greece in 492 BC. Herodotus was presumably repeating an account that had originally used the name "Cush", or something similar, to describe the Kassites; "Cush" was also a name for Ethiopia. A similar confusion of Kassites with Ethiopians is evident in various ancient Greek accounts of the Trojan war hero Memnon, who was sometimes described as a "Cissian" and founder of Susa, and other times as Ethiopian. According to Herodotus, the "Asiatic Ethiopians" lived not in Cissia, but to the north, bordering on "Paricanians" who in turn bordered on the Medes.

During the later Achaemenid period, the Kassites, referred to as "Kossaei", lived in the mountains to the east of Media and were one of several "predatory" mountain tribes that regularly extracted "gifts" from the Achaemenid Persians, according to a citation of Nearchus by Strabo (13.3.6).

But Kassites again fought on the Persian side in the Battle of Gaugamela in 331 BC, in which the Persian Empire fell to Alexander the Great, according to Diodorus Siculus (17.59) (who called them "Kossaei") and Curtius Rufus (4.12) (who called them "inhabitants of the Cossaean mountains"). According to Strabo's citation of Nearchus, Alexander later separately attacked the Kassites "in the winter", after which they stopped their tribute-seeking raids.

Strabo also wrote that the "Kossaei" contributed 13,000 archers to the army of Elymais in a war against Susa and Babylon. This statement is hard to understand, as Babylon had lost importance under Seleucid rule by the time Elymais emerged around 160 BC. If "Babylon" is understood to mean the Seleucids, then this battle would have occurred sometime between the emergence of Elymais and Strabo's death around 25 AD. If "Elymais" is understood to mean Elam, then the battle probably occurred in the 6th century BC. Note that Susa was the capital of Elam and later of Elymais, so Strabo's statement implies that the Kassites intervened to support a particular group within Elam or Elymais against their own capital, which at that moment was apparently allied with or subject to Babylon or the Seleucids.

The latest evidence of Kassite culture is a reference by the 2nd century geographer Ptolemy, who described "Kossaei" as living in the Susa region, adjacent to the "Elymeans". This could represent one of many cases where Ptolemy relied on out-of-date sources.

It is believed that the name of the Kassites is preserved in the name of the Kashgan River, in Lorestan. the above quote was from Wikipedia.

and here is what an Eritrean have to say about this matter.

The agazians known from 1200 b.c....Before that known as the tigrettes and ta xasa or the kassa people..a group of beja clan who allied with the ancient egyptions invaded babel removed the akhadian rule and adopted the semitic tongue,for 500-600 years occupying babel till the elamites (white semites) took babel in 1100-1200 bc (kassites invaded babel in 1700bc and were there till 1200-1100bc)...they named the river tigris after them...after the elamites capture of babel the xasa people who were beja but adopted the semitic language moved west of iraq then south naming themself "ageezays" or "nomads" a word in today tigre meaning wonderers or nomads..by the time they reached yemen and crossed the red sea the established the d'mt kingdom around 1000bc or midri aga'yzyan allying themself with their bedawi speaking beja kins and adulite cousins and defeated the enemy.the sabeans who were of a Semite,the beja semitic speaking "agazian" brought with them a sophisticated art of war and quickly shared and organized a force to be able to defend their home from the sabean threat from Yemen and the nilotic drive originating from south Sudan/Uganda...the nubians recorded their arrival as a new wave of people similar to the beja coming from the Arabian peninsula but with a funny tongue when they speak..they builded many stele among the most famous the stele of matara dating back to 1000bc where they celebrate the defeat of enemy of the land and assert their membership to the land and calling themself the agayzian warriors....many historians think they are the direct descendants of kush fifth son sabteca...among the many clan they had among them 2 spoke their original tongue (belew kelew beja who adopted the semitic tongue upon arriving in the horn of Africa and the hidarebs who till this day are considered to be the purest beja) and one who converted back from geez to bedawi 200 years ago (the halenga who moved to kassala from the highland). Myth, bullshit or there is some fact on it
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Old 05-19-2010, 08:18 AM   #2
EzequielTMann

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Any Y-DNA and MT-DNA info on them?
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Old 05-19-2010, 08:34 AM   #3
antiggill

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My mom is a Lur/Lor and my grandfather has always told me that we are descendants of kassites

btw. If you wanna know what the stereotypical Lur looks like...just refer to my avatar

I doubt we have much to do with Ethiopians but we always made up a disporpprtionate part of the Persian army so I wouldn't be surprised if we were involved in the invasion of Greece
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Old 05-20-2010, 11:45 PM   #4
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Yo, is this the real Barka? WTF, I thought you of all people would know what that Eritrean wrote is horse sh!t.

Their has never been an Agazian tribe anywhere. Not in Yemen or this side of the red sea. There was a "Gaze" people who had their own kingdom north of Axum the city in present day Akele Guzay. In fact, some historians argue that Gaze is modern day Akele Guzay and perhaps may be where the term 'agazan' is coming from.

The three sub-kingdoms, each ruled by a negus (which was also the title of the king of Aksum), were: (i) that of the Agwesat, close to Aksum, and the Gaze of the Cosmas inscription, with a 'capital' at a place called 'LBH (DAE. 8,9)
Source The Tigretes were people who lived just outside of Adulis and are the forefathers of Tigre people. They may have been politically and culturally influential because today, there are three different ethnic groups that have their root word of "Tigr" as part of their ethnic name and language.

BTW: the forefathers of Tigre and Tigrinya people are most likely the forerunners of the Beja people, not some Yemeni or Iraqi nonsense.
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Old 07-06-2010, 12:23 AM   #5
Evelinessa

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Yo, is this the real Barka? WTF, I thought you of all people would know what that Eritrean wrote is horse sh!t.

Their has never been an Agazian tribe anywhere. Not in Yemen or this side of the red sea. There was a "Gaze" people who had their own kingdom north of Axum the city in present day Akele Guzay. In fact, some historians argue that Gaze is modern day Akele Guzay and perhaps may be where the term 'agazan' is coming from.



The Tigretes were people who lived just outside of Adulis and are the forefathers of Tigre people. They may have been politically and culturally influential because today, there are three different ethnic groups that have their root word of "Tigr" as part of their ethnic name and language.

BTW: the forefathers of Tigre and Tigrinya people are most likely the forerunners of the Beja people, not some Yemeni or Iraqi nonsense.
Hello...why are you denying the existence of agazian tribe????they were known as the aga'az tribe in yemen..they were many clans among them..some of them where you might recognise are asa wurta (saho),minferie (saho),hidarebs or al hidarebs (beja),habab (tigre),belew kelew (beja/kebessa),marea (formely saho today tigre)..the last agazian tribe to come from yemen 900 years ago were the halenga who spoke tigre but today speak bedawi and the hidareb's who still speak their native tongue....D'mt empire is the biggest proof for that..in the stele of matara is says "glorious day for the sons of the agaaz who defeated the enemy from the south (habesh sabean ethiopia)" why do you think the ethiopians try to destroy it in the last war and planted tnt to shatter it into pieces??,why do you think the tigrigna people of eritrea have clan structures,why is all the names of towns in eritrea is mostly named after a historic figure or a battle which was conducted in ancient times???when the king of ethiopia yohannes together with his general alula were butchering the tigrigna kebessa highlanders and the halenga appraoched the tigrigna people of eritrea what do you think it meant when the halenga elders said "we are agazians like you we share the same blood and ancestory" for the kebessa to ally themself with the mahdist it was like impossible to think of today's term,it seems you are eritrean and a highlander but you must know your history im sure if you ask your elders they would tell you your line a chance you will be a beja bedawi in origin (belew kelew,hidareb etc.) or a beja agazian (habab e.g asgede,mensai etc.)...Why do you think eritreans are more respected and loved in some part of tribal areas in arabia peninsula???its not because you look better..they also know this history as well.One more thing Tigre/agazian etc. is terms refering to the same thing...it was tigre first then agazian which means nomads was refer to the people who moved to today eritrea.


P.S THAT WAS ME WHO BROUGHT THE ARTICLE.

---------- Post added 2010-07-05 at 15:27 ----------

Yo, is this the real Barka? WTF, I thought you of all people would know what that Eritrean wrote is horse sh!t.

Their has never been an Agazian tribe anywhere. Not in Yemen or this side of the red sea. There was a "Gaze" people who had their own kingdom north of Axum the city in present day Akele Guzay. In fact, some historians argue that Gaze is modern day Akele Guzay and perhaps may be where the term 'agazan' is coming from.



The Tigretes were people who lived just outside of Adulis and are the forefathers of Tigre people. They may have been politically and culturally influential because today, there are three different ethnic groups that have their root word of "Tigr" as part of their ethnic name and language.

BTW: the forefathers of Tigre and Tigrinya people are most likely the forerunners of the Beja people, not some Yemeni or Iraqi nonsense.
PPS AXUM EXISTED 1000 YEARS AFTER d'mt..axum was made of 5 kingdoms...later weakend d'mt,djin,adulite,beja all in eritrea,the fifth was in northern ethiopia...80% eritrean axum was...you need to go further back than that to see the agazian establishment in eritrea without the habesh interference...do you know why the axumite empire disolved??????
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Old 07-06-2010, 02:43 AM   #6
TeLMgNva

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It's bullshit, of course.

Yo, is this the real Barka? WTF, I thought you of all people would know what that Eritrean wrote is horse sh!t.

Their has never been an Agazian tribe anywhere. Not in Yemen or this side of the red sea. There was a "Gaze" people who had their own kingdom north of Axum the city in present day Akele Guzay. In fact, some historians argue that Gaze is modern day Akele Guzay and perhaps may be where the term 'agazan' is coming from.
You're mixing up two different terms. I wrote a good overview of the nomenclature in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akkele_Guzay

Its name has been connected by some to the Gaze of the Monumentum Adulitanum (which later medieval Greek notes in the margins associate with the Aksumite people[2]).[3] If the note regarding the Gaze is accurate, it would connect the name of Akkele Guzay to the Ag`azyan or Agazi (i.e. Ge'ez speakers) of the kingdom of D'mt in Eritrea and northern Ethiopia who later became the Tigray-Tigrinya and Tigre. This connection has been rejected by linguists in modern times, however, due to the lack of the middle voiced pharyngeal fricative in the triliteral root, which is usually preserved in Tigrinya (the main language in Akkele Guzay).[4] Instead, the name may be connected with the Agwezat clan conquered by the 4th century King Ezana of Axum and the Agaze (unvocalized 'GZ, referring either to a person or a group) of the Hawulti at Matara. The Ag`azyan/Ag`azi have a medial pharyngeal (aynu a) which isn't present in "Guzay" or the " 'GZ" of the Hawulti or the "Agwezat" of Ezana.

The YG`DHYN of D`mt are very likely the same word as "Ag`azyan," though. DH in proto-Ge'ez (or whatever you want to call it) was written the same way as modern Z is written, and used where Ge'ez used Z (the Sabaean Z was not used).
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Old 07-06-2010, 09:54 PM   #7
CevepBiageCefm

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It's bullshit, of course.



You're mixing up two different terms. I wrote a good overview of the nomenclature in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akkele_Guzay



The Ag`azyan/Ag`azi have a medial pharyngeal (aynu a) which isn't present in "Guzay" or the " 'GZ" of the Hawulti or the "Agwezat" of Ezana.

The YG`DHYN of D`mt are very likely the same word as "Ag`azyan," though. DH in proto-Ge'ez (or whatever you want to call it) was written the same way as modern Z is written, and used where Ge'ez used Z (the Sabaean Z was not used).
The term akele-guzai also know as akele-saho was a term came only in the 15th century...beside did you hear about the new language which is called dahlaki???its is believed to be the missing ingredient to what the agazians spoke...BASICALLY GEEZ AND SABEAN IS DIFFRENT TO EACH OTHER AS ARABIC AND PERSIANS..both might share a few words but 90% of the words and grammer is different...sabean sounded much like arabic today while geez sounds like tigre or dahlaki...and i would know the diffrence because i could understand both language and the difference...if you want to compare then there isn't better example today than harari (sabean) and tigre (geez) as they are the closest form to both respected mother language.The word agazian was refered to the people when they moved into the highland of eritrea.the term guzay is not to be confused with agazians..agazian is derived from the word agee-zay which means wanderers or nomads,in tigrigna the word is pronounced different kheed-ka...the term is arabic is aga3ez,many people in yemen still speak the language which if you speak tigre you would be able to understand well while the tigrigna speakers will be able to pick up half of the words.harari speakers wouldnt be able to understand anything.
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Old 07-06-2010, 10:31 PM   #8
Quonuttott

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It's bullshit, the Kassites hail from the Zagros, quite a far fetched distance from the horn, in fact such connection is so far off that pigs might as well fly.
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Old 07-06-2010, 11:24 PM   #9
saturninus.ribb

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It's bullshit, the Kassites hail from the Zagros, quite a far fetched distance from the horn, in fact such connection is so far off that pigs might as well fly.
the kassites is just a thought dont rush to conclusion....the ancient egyptions called them ta xasa which is what they called many eritreans 1000 years after their dynasty ended..their language is suspicioulsy close to geez,while the records show they migrated west then south after the fall of their dynasty to yemen (where many agazians came from)...they were also called "tigre" by the kurds,they were allies of the ancient egyptions,they were of cushtic origin (agazians are desandants of sabteca fifth cush son),the adopted the akkhadian language when they established the third dynasty and abandon their own language (same as agazians who spoke a hamitic language before),some of their kings name is so similar to names in eritrea today,the were the same people who helped the ancient egyptions fight the asyyrians in juresalem but this time their home wasnt iraq but eastern arabia around 700bc...but most intresting is what they discovered in south of egypt recently by a british archologist which claims that the people of eritrea were rulers of mesepotomia and they came from there...every one claimed that they were cushtic black people...warriors strong willed people (agazians the same),you must understand that iraq was the cradle of civilzation and many thousands of years ago most of the world population lived within a short distance of each other untill everyone started to migrate to a diffrent direction.the geez/tigre language was anciently is known as XASA even today if you go to some areas in east africa they call geez or tigre as xasa.xassa and kassa hmmm you must admit its worth a look at.
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Old 07-06-2010, 11:35 PM   #10
Gubocang

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kassites the ancestors of the Agazians?

I have no idea. Never heared about those guys...
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Old 07-07-2010, 02:14 AM   #11
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OK OK YOU WANT PROOF...i know the tigrigna speakers in here will be like O-O WHEN THEY SEE THIS...the kassites adopted xthe akhadian language here is words in akhadain languages that is not found no where else..not in any languages..and this is a basic rooted words not loaned so this is the abc of the language...

anāku "I" (for us it means i with a certianity)
atta "you" MALE
atti "you FENALE
šū "he"
šī "she (WE SAY SA)


together with the words ending with ka and ki is common..hmmmm tigre and tigrigna speakers feeling me...wait there is more:

ullītu "that" (tigre speakers pay attention)
ullātu "those" (female)
ullū "that" (male)

annātu "these"
annītu "this"

now for the big prize:

mīnū what? (for us it could also means who or what)
ayyu which?



Genitive Accusative Dative
Person singular Plural Singular Plural Singular Plural
1st -i, -ya * -ni -ni -niāti -am/-nim -niāšim
2nd masculine -ka -kunu -ka -kunūti -kum -kunūšim
feminine -ki -kina -ki -kināti -kim -kināšim
3rd masculine -šū -šunu -šū -šunūti -šum -šunūšim
feminine -ša -šina -ši -šināti -šim -šināšim


THIS IS BEYOND PROOF..THERE ISNT ANY LANGUAGE IN THE WORLD WHERE THE ENDING AND WORDS LIKE SU AND ATTI IS FEATURED OTHER THAN TIGRE AND TIGRIGNA,LOOK AT THE ENDING OF THE WORDS KA-KI-INA-SUM-SIM,YOU PEOPLE NEED TO BELIEVE ME SOMETIMES.

also watch how words end up with "u" alot...if you are a tigrigna speakers dont you get sick of it sometimes?????


so is it worth even considering it??????agazians up.


P.S EXTINT???SAYS WHO???

ALENA ALENA DE-KI AGEE-ZAI.

p.s.s if anyone wants to hear how the akhadian sounded like listen to tigrigna or tigre that will be close enough considering 3000 years of other influences.
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Old 07-07-2010, 02:39 AM   #12
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Akkadian and Tigrinya are both Semitic languages, do you think there's some special connection there?

Ana, Anta, Anti are all proto-Semitic for I, you (m), you (f). And Issu, Isswa in Amharic for he, she are just as close, it's not a Tigrinya thing.

Akkadian wasn't even the Kassite language, but the language of the people they conquered.


Please use paragraphs when you write, btw. The massive walls of text (not in this post, but the other ones) make it hard to read.

Dahlaki isn't some "missing link." It's just a form of Tigre that split off and adopted more Arabic elements than the surrounding languages. At the earliest, it split off some centuries ago, but no way is it separate enough to be a holdover from Sabaean times.


And Ag`azyan comes from the same root as Ge`ez, meaning "free," it has nothing to do with all this pseudohistorical bullshit you come up with.
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Old 07-07-2010, 02:59 AM   #13
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wait there is more...to those who dont understand most of these words are exclusive to tigrigna and tigre words:

laqāḫu=take from leqah.(in ours leqah means take/borrow)
erbēt=four.

BUT THIS WORD TOPS IT ALL:

dann-ūtum=STRONG...(in our language it means the leader/strong),when you say who is your dann-ya or who is their dann-utum it means who is their strongest/leader/cheif...this did raised my eyebrows because im 100% sure this word is not in any semitic languages.

so do i have the right to consider there is a possibilty???kassa/xasa and the movement/habit/looks/history is almsot identical,why would the ancient egyptions call them xasa and and not kassites???everyone knows who the xasa people areif you live in east africa...they are the agazians people of tigrigna/tigre/and few other tribes.

I also found out why the hidarebs are considered the purest beja and forfathers of the xasa/agazian people.
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Old 07-07-2010, 03:07 AM   #14
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Dann-utum/dann-ya, really? Do you know any Semitic languages aside from Tigre & Tigrinya? Danya has the same meaning in Amharic, in Hebrew (The name Dani'el means God is my judge), etc. Erbet is from Proto-Semitic arb`a (Amharic arat, although forty is arba, Arabic arb`ah).
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Old 07-07-2010, 03:22 AM   #15
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Akkadian and Tigrinya are both Semitic languages, do you think there's some special connection there?

Ana, Anta, Anti are all proto-Semitic for I, you (m), you (f). And Issu, Isswa in Amharic for he, she are just as close, it's not a Tigrinya thing.

Akkadian wasn't even the Kassite language, but the language of the people they conquered.


Please use paragraphs when you write, btw. The massive walls of text (not in this post, but the other ones) make it hard to read.

Dahlaki isn't some "missing link." It's just a form of Tigre that split off and adopted more Arabic elements than the surrounding languages. At the earliest, it split off some centuries ago, but no way is it separate enough to be a holdover from Sabaean times.


And Ag`azyan comes from the same root as Ge`ez, meaning "free," it has nothing to do with all this pseudohistorical bullshit you come up with.
issa issi,atti is derived from geez..this is the focus here..dont worry about amharic and such for now....and the akkadian were the language the kassite adopted i think i said that if you read my post carefully,the agazians was a name given 3000 years ago,before that they were known as xasa which means semitic speaking hamites...


agazian doesn't mean free....maybe it does in amharic or the reformed meaning but you need to find the root words for it...its derived from agee-zay which means to wonder or nomads....its a name given by the agazian themselves because many of their inner tribes were migrating and nomad-ing especially when they moved to eritrea 2000bc-1000bc......


Dahlaki language is actually closer to himyarites..i dont know if you speak tigre but im guessing you dont....sabean language which include habesh is completely different for a starter the word son in sabean is "ibn" while in geez its "wed" among many others...

finally adopting a language doesn't mean you are descandant of their ancestory..which means if amharic adopted the geez language and we have a look at their ancestory they are not even close to claim they are desandants of the agazians...tribes like mensai,asgede,asa-wurta,minferie,halenga,bani amer,belew kelew(KEBESA including nabara,zual and many others),marea, and many others are bonafide lineage of the agazians.

One more question for you prior to 300ad what was the name of the "geez" language????you probarly wouldnt know that since the term geez was given by the tigre speakers...what ever your answer is dont say sabean because we would look like we going in circle.

we are also looking at the grammer that is what makes a language,words ending with ki-ka-sum and u is not even any close to amharic and no way could be a concidence...3000 years later and that should still be the primary roots of any language,im more focused about the grammer than the words.

At the end of the day like the thread starter stated this is to find out about the ancestory of the agazians and there is nothin wrong if we look in depth no harm done.

---------- Post added 2010-07-06 at 18:25 ----------

Dann-utum/dann-ya, really? Do you know any Semitic languages aside from Tigre & Tigrinya? Danya has the same meaning in Amharic, in Hebrew (The name Dani'el means God is my judge), etc. Erbet is from Proto-Semitic arb`a (Amharic arat, although forty is arba, Arabic arb`ah).
nah its DANN-YAA NOT DANI'EL.IT MEANS YOUR LEADER OR YOUR STRONG MAN...im not sure its in amharic but in tigre or tigrigna when you say "who is your dann-ya" it means who is your strongest or your leader or cheif in your village or your clan.

i speak arabic fluently read and write as other semitic language..im not bad in farsi too which is persian a beginner more like it.
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Old 07-07-2010, 06:05 AM   #16
AndyPharmc

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The "Dan" in Dani'el means "judge." "Dan" in Hebrew means judge, Danya means judge in Amharic, Danya means judge in Tigrinya. Do you see the pattern here?

You clearly have a lot of reading to do. There's a lot of Semitic morphology and history you do not know or understand yet.
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Old 07-07-2010, 06:14 AM   #17
Trientoriciom

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I think the Egyptian form for "judge" was wḏ'
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Old 07-07-2010, 06:35 AM   #18
12ZHeWZa

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The "Dan" in Dani'el means "judge." "Dan" in Hebrew means judge, Danya means judge in Amharic, Danya means judge in Tigrinya. Do you see the pattern here?

You clearly have a lot of reading to do. There's a lot of Semitic morphology and history you do not know or understand yet.
DANN-YA MEANS ELDER/stronger/leader/mightiest IN TIGRIGNA...do you speak tigrigna????judged in tigrigna is "mehsab" derived from hesab which is loaned from the northern semitic branch over the years,im not sure about the hebrew connection there with amharic but alot of hebrew words were inducted into amharic during the solominic dynasty..remember there are 2 branches of semitic tongue the hebrew,arabic,sabean is one branch and the akkahadian was another...dont rush into making judgment because they are all semitic,many words which sounds similar could mean diffrent things...in eritrean tigrigna is i tell you who is your dannya it means who is the leader mightiest strongest...like when 2 of youth kids wants to fight for example,one might say who is your dannya meaning who is your leader or the strongest out from you if they want to fight or communicate etc.

I'll give you another example how do you say "very" in amharic and in tigrigna???
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Old 07-07-2010, 06:35 AM   #19
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I think the Egyptian form for "judge" was wḏ'
We're talking Proto-Semitic level of depth here, not proto-Afro-Asiatic. Clearly the "judge" meaning is secondary to "powerful man/arbiter" meaning.

TBH, I'm not convinced that the Amharic and Tigrinya words aren't loanwords from Ge'ez (which would have received it from Aramaic or Hebrew).
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Old 07-07-2010, 06:45 AM   #20
RooldpalApata

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We're talking Proto-Semitic level of depth here, not proto-Afro-Asiatic. Clearly the "judge" meaning is secondary to "powerful man/arbiter" meaning.
I wasn't refering to any Proto-form (if I were, I wouldn't have written "I think", but rather look it up), I just mentioned it since it sounded very similar. I think the "Agazians descend from the Kassites" is too far fetched, and that there really isn't anything more to discuss about it.
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