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Old 10-17-2005, 07:00 AM   #1
jeaccatty

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I have always understood "guagua" to be an onomonopia based on the sound of a bus horn. That's interesting - I never thought of that. In Chile, a guagua is a baby or child, things that also make noise, as in, y guai y guai y guai.
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Old 11-02-2005, 07:00 AM   #2
dremucha

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Or are we only being "Graded" on content?CCCCCCCCCCccccccccc
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Old 12-08-2005, 07:00 AM   #3
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They were probably talking about me too The nerve! I'd like to learn some "nice" words!!! I don't plan on calling anyone names...

And this is the new generation of Dominicans in my family...u know the ones that can barely speak Spanish. My mother is Black which is why I don't know that much Spanish.

The kids in my family have foul mouths in English and Spanish. I should have known their potty-mouths were talking dirty. Disculpa si te ofendo!
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Old 12-18-2005, 07:00 AM   #4
Zptmsemk

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Originally posted by jerseynegrita06
Are you Dominican? I'm sure you know these words and that does not make you an more illiterate than a person who doesn't. No I am not Dominican and I do know some of the words. I never use any of those words except for one...................CHOPO. Learn it. Don't be it!
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Old 01-04-2006, 07:00 AM   #5
yasalaioqe

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Ok...I've been hanging around my Dominican family and pretending like I know what's going on, lol...laughing at their jokes and such. Now someone please tell me what I've been laughing at...I've written down some of the things I've heard...please excuse the spelling...

La creta
Tu 'ta pasa
pariguayo
palomo
no le de mente
cojelo suave
que bufeo
no te quille
pajaro
me tripiate
conjole
el diache
dimelo
que tira peo
degrasia or degrasiaita
malba or asarosa
y eh facil
tu si jode
cundango
mira cara de fuiche
que lokera
topao

Like I said...I can't spell...and some of these words I think I have an idea but I just want to be sure! Thanks in advance!
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Old 01-06-2006, 07:00 AM   #6
tobia

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EXCUSE ME!!
Everyone uses some form of slang. Even if its saying ya insteda of yes.
Unless your going to hangout all your life in a little gated community forever you have to learn some slang. Even the educated use the words vaina. And when your walking down the street and someone says something to you its a good idea to be able to understand it.
Just because you learn slang and can inderstand it dosne't make you uneducated. It makes you smarted and more able to fit in where ever you are.
You bunch of poopy pants you!!!!
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Old 01-14-2006, 07:00 AM   #7
zenihan

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Ta to' means it's ok.
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Old 01-27-2006, 07:00 AM   #8
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I have heard two "versions".One was that when the US Marines were here in "64"?,they set 55 gallon drums around their posts to collect the soda cans.They painted"Save The Can" (Zafacon)on the side of the drums!
The "Safety Can" is anyone's guess!

How about,"Gringo"? The origin that I heard was,The cowboys riding heard on their cows down in Texas used to sing to them at night to calm the heard.The song they sang the most was "GREEN GROW the lilacs".From Green Grow,comes "Gringo"!

They are pretty much all made up stories,but NEVER tell that to a Dominican,they are positive of where all the words came from!!!!!

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Old 01-27-2006, 07:00 AM   #9
Rtebydou

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What's a safety can? See one at http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bi...0026/5140-0029

Just knowing the way that Dominicans pronounce English words, and how Dominicans use old jugs and oil drums for household purposes, I suspect that "Zafacon" does derive from the words "safety can". "Save the can" would not, in my less than expert opinion, morph into zafacon.
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:00 AM   #10
majestictwelve

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Originally posted by AZB


humo= state of intoxication (drunk)

viena = a thing

anyone wants to add more?
You mean " vaina", right ?

Oh, and the "humo" is pronounced "jumo" just like "harto".

Isn't it funny how Dominicans will drop the s's but insist on pronouncing the H's when it's supposed to be silent ?
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Old 02-18-2006, 07:00 AM   #11
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Although I have a halfway decent grasp of the Spanish Language I decided some time ago that when I finally move to the DR, I am going to learn my "Dominican Spanish" from well spoken more affluent Dominicans and not from Chopos in the campo. Imagine if you wanted to learn English and had to learn it from some moron who has been hanging out on a street corner in Brooklyn for the past 30 years and then trying to converse and be accepted by more intelligent Americans. Apply that same concept to who you learn "Dominican" from and worry about the slang terms later. I assume you will pick up what you need as you go along.

Larry
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Old 02-19-2006, 07:00 AM   #12
Rtebydou

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Originally posted by An Evil
'Guagua' could be disputed, since various onomatopeia cases could produce a word like it. But since the term is very restricted to buses, and not noisy things with horns, I was willing to put it on the list. Not that I know the definitive answer either, but "Tap-tap" refers only to buses.
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Old 02-25-2006, 07:00 AM   #13
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Jury's still out on "The whole nine yards"

For what it's worth, some of those words are pretty much undisputable, like Ace and Paire. The older ones could be verified, but I was being conservative when I included them. I didn't put mangú, or yaniqueque, because the explanations I've heard seem a bit embellished. You could find some of them plus a few more here. Like safacón, which comes from safety can.

'Guagua' could be disputed, since various onomatopeia cases could produce a word like it. But since the term is very restricted to buses, and not noisy things with horns, I was willing to put it on the list.
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Old 03-08-2006, 07:00 AM   #14
yasalaioqe

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Originally posted by Tony C
Dominicanisms, just like ebonics, serves no purpose except to lower the standards of literacy. You are doing neither Dominicans nor yourself any service by using them. Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinions. I just feel that learning a few slang words will help me to understand the people who live there (and the people in my corner store) better because they do not speak Spanish the same way it is taught in school. I'm not trying to lower the standards of literacy. Are you Dominican? I'm sure you know these words and that does not make you an more illiterate than a person who doesn't.
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Old 03-11-2006, 07:00 AM   #15
Nesskissabe

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My understanding of the v de vaca and b de burro is that they are pronounced the same (by blending the sounds of the v and b in such a way that you are vibrating your lips but not using your teeth). It does seem that the sound leans un chin towards the b.
mk
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Old 03-13-2006, 07:00 AM   #16
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"que lo que" or "K lo K" = que lo que hay.....? sort of like whats happening???

"barbarasa" comes from barbaro (male) = barbarian. Barbarasa = bigtime barbarian in feminine term.

other street language / terminologies:

chuliando = kissing, making out

Jeva = cute girl
Jevita= cute young girl

Jevo or Jevito = young stylish guy

a po ta bien = all right then

cuero= slut or even prostitute

humo= state of intoxication (drunk)

rumo= rum

pequenia fria = small bottle of presidente beer

mi pana = my friend

viena = a thing

tigre = street wise guy or just any guy

tigrasa = a wise ass girl

ta to = esta bien = all right

se fue pa las palmas.... = young girl went away with an older
guy... you know for what?

No joda or no me jodas = don't bother me or don't f**k with me.

anyone wants to add more?
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Old 04-18-2006, 07:00 AM   #17
AricGoffgog

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La creta =La cresta, as in the rooster by its appearance, the lips major and minor of a vagina.

Tu 'ta pasa = Tu estas pasada, you area a smart ass
pariguayo=Pendejo in spanish, fool, idiot.
palomo=Jevo o pajaro, maricon
no le de mente=Get it out of your head, dont let it bother you
cojelo suave=take it easy
que bufeo=what a fun
no te quille=dont let it get you mad
pajaro=Maricon, faggot, homo, queer, etc
me tripiate= you made me trip, laugh
conjole=like conchole, for not saying "Coño!!!!"
el diache= El Diablo, same not to say it full way
dimelo=say
que tira peo=pedorro, fart guy
degrasia or degrasiaita=desgraciadita, with bad attitude (fem)
malba or asarosa=same bad, mala
y eh facil= to refer something is not easy ( for dominicans mostly always)
tu si jode= you are a pain in the ass
cundango=male maricon, bugarron, ****s with guys
mira cara de fuiche=**** face
que lokera=crazy
topao=crazy, loco

Any question ask a foreigner.
GI
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Old 04-23-2006, 07:00 AM   #18
Nesskissabe

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I think the definitions by "an evil" are very logical.
Many languages take American, British and other words and adjust the pronunciation to fit the local accent and make the word their own.
mk
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Old 04-30-2006, 07:00 AM   #19
yasalaioqe

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I have another question...when do we pronounce the b's like v's? Like when I say I have to go to the bathroom, I say...Me voy al vaño. Or when I ask if someone has a receipt I say...tiene recivo...and it was raining I say estava lloviendo...not estaba llobiendo...how weird!! So when do we use those pronunciations?
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Old 05-01-2006, 07:00 AM   #20
yasalaioqe

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Default Yo no speake Espanish!
Ok...y'all now how every country has it's own "dialect"...well I want to know some Dominican Spanish! You know...like..."que lo que" and "bufeo" and "barbarasa"! Can someone tell me some of these exclusive words? And can someone also tell me what "ta' to" means, lol...
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