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Old 07-08-2012, 12:46 AM   #1
inve.tment

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Default Lactobacillus Planatarus
First off I have to say cultured vegetables are not only super foods, they are without question...medicine.

Raw unpasteurized organic sauerkraut is the go to item for getting LP. SK is very easy to make, and the results on the digestive system range from remarkable to utopian bliss.

The short list is that you now digest more nutrients from your food, greatly boost your immune system, heal and strengthen the gut wall (see leaky gut syndrome), burn out all bad bacteria, and pathogens from your digestive tract.



"L. plantarum is one of the most important bacteria in our systems because it is generally immune to antibiotics."

"An effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease, and colitis. It has the ability to destroy pathogens and to preserve critical nutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants.
It has also shown the rare ability to produce L. lysine, a beneficial amino acid. One of the most exciting uses for Lactobacillus plantarum involves using it to deliver therapeutic compounds and proteins to the body."
http://probiotic.org/lactobacillus-plantarum.htm


DIY Sauerkraut...

About as simple as it gets.

-Cut up cabbage
-Add salt
-Pound it for a few mins
-Add to jar making sure to keep everything submerged
-65-72 deg F for two weeks

After cutting cabbage up with a knife, I like to use a large can of unopened tomato juice to pound down the cabbage in a large flat bottomed pot (5 mins). I use 1 tsp of non iodized sea salt per pound of cabbage. Press down firmly into jars using a leaf and a shot glass, etc.. on top to keep everything submerged. Keep at 65 deg F for two weeks. If you have to use to water to fully submerge the cabbage, make sure no chlorine.





http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/food-pr...ion-sauerkraut
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Old 07-08-2012, 12:51 AM   #2
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Looks like I'm not the only one who thinks this now.

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Old 07-08-2012, 07:23 AM   #3
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I wonder if you get the same effect from kimchi. I've made sauerkraut many times. Lately, I've used red cabbage and it's great. I love fermented foods. I have a book called Wild Fermentation by Sandor Elix Katz that has a lot of recipes for fermented foods. Here is the Web Site for this book:

http://www.wildfermentation.com/wild-fermentation/

I like sauerkraut a lot, but I like Kimchi even more because it is more complex, and has a number of veggies and spices in it. Best sauerkraut I ever made was when I put onion slices in it. Next I'm going to try finely sliced green onions in the kraut. And maybe adding fish sauce to it.


Hatha
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:10 AM   #4
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10 reasons to take a probiotic daily

http://www.naturalnews.com/036419_pr..._bacteria.html

"Probiotic intake for overall good health has been underestimated by even the alternative health community. The fact is that gut bacteria greatly affects both overall physical and mental health.

There are 400 to 500 species of bacteria residing in your gut or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which if opened up and laid out flat would cover a tennis court. If placed on a scale, your GI tract bacteria would weigh in at three pounds.

Probiotic bacteria have many more functions than digestion. They trigger immune system reactions throughout the body, including activating T-cells.

Good bacteria need to comprise 85 percent of the intestinal flora while allowing the remaining 15 percent to be pathogenic. Two-thirds or more of the immune system relies on this. (Source 1 below)

You can supplement probiotics with the best supplement online or from a health food store. This is critical if you've gone a round or two with antibiotics for whatever reason. But you have to know what to look for and how to avoid being deceived. (Source 2 below)

Another method of taking in probiotics is through fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, miso, kimchi, or any other fermented food you can purchase or make yourself. Milk kefir and water kefir are excellent sources of probiotics that can be consumed daily.

Making your own milk or water kefir is not difficult once you get the "starter grains," which can be ordered online or procured from someone in a local Weston A Price Foundation chapter.

A list of YouTube video demos for milk kefirs is in source 3 below, while you can watch water kefir videos from source 4 below.

Ten reasons to consume probiotics

(1) Enhance immunity - a double-blind clinical test involving patients in intensive care proved that viable (alive) probiotics prevented multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), the number one cause of mortality among intensive care patients. (Source 5 below)

If probiotics can do this, what can they do to prevent chronic flues and colds and allergies?

(2) The immune protection of mother's milk is enhanced if the mother takes probiotics during or before pregnancy. If breast feeding is impossible, then adding probiotics and prebiotics (what probiotic bacteria feed on) to a baby formula free from fluoridated water and sweeteners can be tried.

(3) Probiotics can reverse ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and other gut inflammations that occur from a lack of sufficient probiotics.

(4) Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity (GS) symptoms are handled by adding probiotics.

(5) Processed foods and low fiber diets allow the pathogenic bacteria to overwhelm the good guys and diminish colon function. It's important to add probiotics even if you drop the standard American diet (SAD).

(6) When pathogenic bacteria upset the 85/15 balance of probiotic to bad bacteria, yeast infections such as Candida flourish.

(7) A healthy gut flora balance helps prevent cancer by nourishing enzymes that inhibit tumor production throughout the body.

(8) Sufficient probiotic intestinal flora prevents radiation damage from X-rays and CT scans to the large and small intestines.

(9) GMOs are used in many processed foods and antibiotics are in lots of our non-organic meat and dairy products. They both destroy probiotic bacteria, making it necessary to add probiotic materials back if you've had any of those foods.

(10) Dr. Natasha Campbell-Mcbride discovered how to cure her son of autism through a diet that restored his probiotic levels and heal his inflammatory conditions. She developed GAPS, gut and psychology syndrome, confirming the connection with gut health and mental health. (Source 6 below)"
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:02 AM   #5
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If you want to drop the Standard American Diet, it is a good idea to clean yourself out before you adopt a healthier eating regimen. You can do that by fasting, or by a number of cleanses that limit intake only to foods that flush you out, like lemons and fruit juices. You can also use a colon cleanser, usually consisting of psyllium husk powder and ground flax seeds. That would further reduce the pathogenic bacteria in your gut. It also helps to eat alkalizing foods, and avoid acidifying foods. I have heard that 70+% of your immune system resides in your gut.


Hatha
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:33 AM   #6
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I am seeing lots of probiotics in my neighborhood CVS. They are not cheap, but take a primary shelving spot. Looks like people are waking up to it.


Have to be careful which cabbages you buy, lots of nitrates in some.
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:16 PM   #7
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OK I am a noob.

You're basically letting cabbage spoil in water for two weeks at room temperature. This is safe?
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:49 PM   #8
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OK I am a noob.

You're basically letting cabbage spoil in water for two weeks at room temperature. This is safe?
Just don't sound right does it?
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:52 PM   #9
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Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread member of the genus Lactobacillus, commonly found in many fermented food products as well as anaerobic plant matter. It is also present in saliva (from which it was first isolated). It has the ability to liquefy gelatin.[1] L. plantarum has one of the largest genomes known among the lactic acid bacteria and is a very flexible and versatile species.
Contents

Metabolism

L. plantarum is a Gram-positive aerotolerant bacteria that grows at 15 C (59 F) but not at 45 C (113 F), and produces both isomers of lactic acid (D and L). This species and related lactobacilli are unusual in that they can respire oxygen but have no respiratory chain or cytochromes — the consumed oxygen ultimately ends up as hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide, it is presumed, acts as a weapon to exclude competing bacteria from the food source. In place of the protective enzyme superoxide dismutase present in almost all other oxygen-tolerant cells, this organism accumulates millimolar quantities of manganese polyphosphate. Manganese is also used by L. plantarum in a pseudo-catalase to lower reactive oxygen levels. Because the chemistry by which manganese complexes protect the cells from oxygen damage is subverted by iron, these cells contain virtually no iron atoms; in contrast, a cell of Escherichia coli of comparable volume contains over one million iron atoms. Because of this L. plantarum cannot be used to produce active enzymes that require a heme complex such as true catalases.
Lactobacillus plantarum, like many lactobacillus species, can be cultured using MRS media.
Products

Silage

Lactobacillus plantarum is the most common bacterium used in silage inoculants. During the anaerobic conditions of ensilage, these organisms quickly dominate the microbial population, and, within 48 hours, they begin to produce lactic and acetic acids via the Embden-Meyerhof Pathway, further diminishing their competition. Under these conditions, L. plantarum strains producing high levels of heterologous proteins have been found to remain highly competitive. This quality could allow this species to be utilized as an effective biological pretreatment for lignocellulosic biomass.
Food Products

L. plantarum is commonly found in many fermented food products including sauerkraut, pickles, brined olives, Korean kimchi, Nigerian ogi, sourdough, and other fermented plant material, and also some cheeses, fermented sausages, and stockfish. The high levels of this organism in food also makes it an ideal candidate for the development of probiotics. In Juana Frias et al.(2008)'s study, L. plantarum has been applied to reduce the allergenicity of soy flour. The result showed that, compared to other microbes, L. plantarum-fermented soy flour showed the highest reduction in IgE immunoreactivity (96–99%), depending upon the sensitivity of the plasma used. L. plantarum is also found in dadiah, a traditional fermented buffalo milk of Minangkabau tribe, Indonesia.[2]
Therapeutics

The ability of L. plantarum to survive in the human gastro-intestinal tract makes it a possible in vivo delivery vehicle for therapeutic compounds or proteins.
Antimicrobial Property

The ability of L. plantarum to produce antimicrobial substances helps them survive in the gastro-intestinal tract of humans. The antimicrobial substances produced have shown significant effect on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.
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Old 07-11-2012, 03:28 PM   #10
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OK I am a noob.

You're basically letting cabbage spoil in water for two weeks at room temperature. This is safe?
It's a wild fermentation using Lacto. Brewers do it all the time.

The reason why Belgian lambics are so famous is that the local wild bacterias and yeast are of a strain that develop great flavors, and only occur naturally in that area.

Most pathogens cannot survive fermentation (at least in beer).

The wife has been making kombucha lately... become quite the brewer in her own right!
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:29 PM   #11
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You're basically letting cabbage spoil in water for two weeks at room temperature. This is safe?
Saurekraut is one of the ultimate survival foods. During WW2, armies on both sides (German, Soviet) , and lots of common folk lived on it.

Don't add vinegar.
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:34 PM   #12
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Additions to recipes:

1. You can add carrots (use grater) or cranberries.

2. Put a heavy object on top of cabbage to let the juice out. A good size stone will do.
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:32 PM   #13
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Thanks for the replies everyone.

So just mash it up and throw it in water and put a lid on it and leave it for two weeks?
Seriously?

I feel like I am missing something.
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:54 PM   #14
inve.tment

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Thanks for the replies everyone.

So just mash it up and throw it in water and put a lid on it and leave it for two weeks?
Seriously?

I feel like I am missing something.
Adding the salt, and mashing it up releases the juice from the cabbage. This should hopefully produce enough juice to keep everything submerged. If not, add some water. The rest is proper temperature, and time. You can add juice from a previous batch instead of water as this will speed up the fermentation.
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:58 PM   #15
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And absolutely no threat of botulism or anything?

(Sorry, too lazy to research, but too interested to stop asking questions)
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:06 PM   #16
inve.tment

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And absolutely no threat of botulism or anything?

(Sorry, too lazy to research, but too interested to stop asking questions)
The salt prevents the bad bacteria from growing, and allows good the bacteria in the cabbage to take over.

A little bit of Sauerkraut on the side helps every meal digest so well. I've noticed fantastic results so far.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:11 PM   #17
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And absolutely no threat of botulism or anything?

(Sorry, too lazy to research, but too interested to stop asking questions)
Awoke, none.

You don't even have to put a lid on it, it's best to mash it up with you hands, add salt, put a heavy object on top for it to let more juice out. Needs proper amount of salt, it is essentially a preservative, and the process forms a lactic acid..something like that, which is also preservative.

When it is done after a couple of weeks, put it in glass jars (plastic ok, but you know...) and in a freezer or a cold basement.

Did I mention 2 armies were living basically on it through the whole WW2? Also, in countries with long winter (Russia, Canada) people make it for preps, store and eat throughout winter.

Have been eating home made product like that since early childhood.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:15 PM   #18
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Thanks FreeEnergy. Last question then:

If you are cutting it up, then mashing it up, then canning it in its own juices, why bother with putting a heavy object on it to get the liquid out to begin with?

Same disclaimer applies:

(Sorry, too lazy to research, but too interested to stop asking questions)
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:19 PM   #19
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Because when you mash it breaks the leaves and some juice comes out, but usually not all. Additional weight gets more of a juice out and also makes the final product softer and actually crunchier, I think (you'll hear a crunch when you eat them).
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:50 PM   #20
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Thanks for the replies everyone.

So just mash it up and throw it in water and put a lid on it and leave it for two weeks?
Seriously?

I feel like I am missing something.
I posted an article on the method outlined by the Weston A. Price Foundation in my post here:
http://gold-silver.us/forum/showthre...ted-Sauerkraut

The reason this method is so good compared to others is since it uses whey from raw milk as a starter culture. This gives you a full spectrum of probiotic bacteria, and it only takes 3-4 days to ferment to the proper amount. So this method is quick and high quality essentially.

I developed my own method to make sauerkraut with trial and error using mason jars. Some people buy fermentation crocks once they get hardcore with this stuff:

http://www.amazon.com/TSM-Products-F...dp/B002UUT4CI/

I've been thinking of getting of of these, but I've been using the large, wide-mouth mason jars. Twice a day I'd use a metal skewer (like for a shish kabobs), and poke out the air bubbles as much as I could. I did this since the volume of the air bubbles in the mason jar forced the liquid to expand and escape from the top (no matter HOW tightly you put the mason jar lid.) So I found it best to screw the lid on the mason jar lightly, and then poke at the air bubbles twice a day so the mason jar didn't overflow. If it's your first time I recommend you put something below the mason jar incase liquid does expand over, so it catches it. I think you need to practice and use your best judgement since your climate, elevation, temperature, and humidity probably all play factors on how it "grows", since it's really alive.
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