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Old 08-23-2012, 07:17 PM   #1
LoloLibia

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Default Driving Range Rhythm / Focus
Hey all,

I'm relatively new to golf. I've probably played 18 5-6 times over the past two years (haven't had time to really get serious). recently I've been trying to get more into the game - I bought a few new clubs and have been hitting every chance I can get, from pitching in my back yard to hitting the range and practicing putting whenever I can.

I've noticed that recently I end up at the range (normally bring 3-4 clubs) and start hitting from high to low (recently P wedge / 7 iron / 4 iron / fairway wood), hitting about 25 balls with each club. Problem is I start losing focus, and without really much guidance, I tend to start slapping at the ball. Before long, I've hit over 130 balls without accomplishing anything.

I think the reasonable solution is to have a lesson or two, but I'm in the NYC and really want to try and get lessons from high quality instructors who will give me good advice, but until I do, I was hoping to simplify and slow down my range time.

Do you guys have things you focus on when at the range? Small things with your swing, follow through, set up, etc. that help you slow down and make shots count before you get tired and sloppy?

Thanks all, looking forward to hearing some response.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:26 PM   #2
johnsonjunior

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What helps me a lot is that I make sure I follow the same pre-shot routine as if I was playing on the course. I used to go to the range and just hit balls one after the other without any type of break between balls. It really hurt my rhythm and I carried those mistake to the course. Now, I make sure that I stop after every shot on the range and go through the same routine as I do on the course. I think this will really help you also with your focus.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:27 PM   #3
Kingerix

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I fight slowing my tempo down, so I try to focus on that. Try coming up with a game or target practice to keep the range session loose and fun. If it's not fun, why do it?
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:30 PM   #4
VomsVomaMew

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IMHO, you should either be working on one aspect of your swing, and focus exclusively on it at least for a couple of dozen balls., or you should be "playing golf on the driving range". in the second case, you would imagine you are on the course, pick out targets, hit to them, figure out if you landed in the "fairway" or "rough" etc, change up clubs etc until you get to the "green", and keep GIR+ scores. This will keep you focussed.

Again, IMHO.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:54 PM   #5
nasxbrtyol

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I focus on the impact zone. Take 4 balls and practice a 9 to 3 swing. Then take 4 balls and hit a normal shot. Rinse and repeat. Also you can play a round in your head. Pick a course and then use the clubs you would normally use on that course.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:07 PM   #6
Creva4k

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I think you'll get more out of putting practice than range time at your skill level without lessons. 9 months later after really delving into lesson, I'm still trying to get rid of all the terrible things I taught myself on the driving range.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:18 PM   #7
adverwork

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Do you guys have things you focus on when at the range? Small things with your swing, follow through, set up, etc. that help you slow down and make shots count before you get tired and sloppy?
Yes. I generally follow this routine:
1. Always use a club or stick to aid my alignment
2. Always hit to a specific target
3. I try to do my pre-shot routine with every shot

If I'm hitting the ball reasonably well, I try to work my way through my bag. Sometimes this might be even clubs low to high then odd clubs high to low (e.g., 8i, 6i, 4h, 3w, D, 3h, 5i, 7i, 9i, etc.). Sometimes this might be all clubs low to high for 4 shots with driver hit in between for 4 shots (i.e., 9i x4, driver x4, 8i x4, driver x4, 7i x4, etc.)

If I am not hitting the ball well or if I'm working on a single club (driver) I don't work my way through my bag but really instead focus on the 3 or 4 swing keys for me (left arm straight, left wrist flat, not taking the club back too inside, feeling weight on the ball of my right foot) until I start compressing the ball nicely and having a good ball flight.

I usually reach the point of diminishing returns at about 75 balls. That is more than enough to work my way through my bag. If it is one of the bad hitting days and I haven't figured it out by 75 balls I recognize that it is time to go home and try again another day.
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Old 08-24-2012, 12:36 AM   #8
sarasaraseda

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i try not to hit more than 50 or 60 balls at the range. try to work on something specific, like a specific swing thought, otherwise i'm just wailing on balls randomly and without purpose.
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Old 08-24-2012, 12:39 AM   #9
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I get to a point where I will mentally play several holes on the range. For example, I know that on the first hole of my home course, a 380 yard par 4, that i will likely be hitting driver 8 iron or something close. So, on the range, I will picture the tee shot and hit driver at a target, then grab my 8 iron and aim for a target, etc. I do this for several holes. It really helps you keep focus and work on your mental imagery for shotmaking.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:02 AM   #10
zithromaxlinks

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I think you'll get more out of putting practice than range time at your skill level without lessons. 9 months later after really delving into lesson, I'm still trying to get rid of all the terrible things I taught myself on the driving range.
That is some great advice. I played for 3 decades and had some lessons about 15 years ago that helped me go from a 13 to a 6. I got sloppy after taking some time off and finally got serious at the end of last year. I started taking lessons this year again and I'm far more focused on what I work on. My handicap has slowly dropped and I have never hit the ball better. Lessons is the best thing you can do for your game, bar none.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:08 AM   #11
bely832new

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I think you'll get more out of putting practice than range time at your skill level without lessons. 9 months later after really delving into lesson, I'm still trying to get rid of all the terrible things I taught myself on the driving range.
I like this, and what chunky said earlier. I don't do a lot of full swing stuff on the range, mainly just half and 3/4 shots by focusing on ball first contact. I'll pick a target and go after it with 2-3 different clubs. Stop and take break, go roll some putts or hit some chips to get you out of the routine.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:16 AM   #12
XGoFivk7

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I have drills and stuff that I do at the range to keep me focused. I also take a fair bit of time between shots like in a real round and try to focus on exactly what I want to do with each ball by imagining a scenario for each shot.
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:16 PM   #13
zithromaxlinks

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1) Always have a target.
2) Use the same pre-shot routine every time.
3) Focus on tempo. Try to get the same timing with each swing.
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Old 08-24-2012, 06:26 PM   #14
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Sometimes I will pretend I am playing actual holes on a course. I'll hit driver, then a mid iron, then a wedge, all to specific targets and going thru my on course pre shot routine.
Keeps me from "hit the ball, rake one over, hit the ball, rake one over...."
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:16 PM   #15
DeronBoltonRen

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Sometimes I will pretend I am playing actual holes on a course. I'll hit driver, then a mid iron, then a wedge, all to specific targets and going thru my on course pre shot routine.
Keeps me from "hit the ball, rake one over, hit the ball, rake one over...."
After I warm up, I do this as well and find it helps. Gets you in a good rhythm and is more fun.
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Old 08-26-2012, 06:44 AM   #16
skupaemauto

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1) Always have a target.
2) Use the same pre-shot routine every time.
3) Focus on tempo. Try to get the same timing with each swing.
^^^^^ This ^^^^^ Or I feel like I am just wasting time. I also warm up with stretching and a work each club first with no more than 5 balls each, then I get specific for about 100 balls total.
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Old 08-26-2012, 09:30 PM   #17
neotheMit

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IMHO, you should either be working on one aspect of your swing, and focus exclusively on it at least for a couple of dozen balls., or you should be "playing golf on the driving range". in the second case, you would imagine you are on the course, pick out targets, hit to them, figure out if you landed in the "fairway" or "rough" etc, change up clubs etc until you get to the "green", and keep GIR+ scores. This will keep you focussed.

Again, IMHO.
This is a good idea, I'm gonna start doing that. I have a tendency to sort of "go through the motion" by the end of a bucket.
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:13 PM   #18
Kausilwf

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one of the best advices I have ever heard on practicing came from a Leadbetter academy teacher. To put your balls 10 yards behind you when you practice so every time you hit a ball you have to walk and this helps you concentrate and eliminate the "machine gun effect". I also take a practice swing before each shot, all this conbined helps slow things down and help you concentrate on the next shot. You should gıve this a go!
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Old 08-27-2012, 10:20 AM   #19
Arexytece

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When I lose focus, I just take a break. Drink some water, talk to a friend, check the phone or whatever. Beating hundreds of balls in one straight session is impossible for me.
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