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Old 09-21-2012, 04:55 PM   #1
Hdzcxqoi

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As the other's say, your only hope is to keep the food away from your pet - and that's easier said than done as if there is ANY chance of getting hold of food, they'll find it!
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:46 PM   #2
BamSaitinypap

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That's tough. My brother has wondered how it was possible that whenever Peanuts wanted some food, she would stay on a "down" position and look at him for the longest of time. He was curious how I was able to get the dog to stay that way especially when we're eating our meals.

It's always a great thing to start early. When she used to beg, we completely ignore her. And she knows that she will never get anything unless she's given food.

Anyway, maybe you should try practicing discipline in the house. Does your dog know the "sit" and "down" trick? If he does, then try this technique before you feed him. When you're about to give him the food bowl, ask him to "sit" or "down" and wait 'til he does it. Saying it repetitively will just make the dog think the command is noise so once or twice is enough. Once he goes unto the position you asked of him, say "good dog" and put the bowl down.

Continue to do this every meal time and practice on the duration of the command (10 sec, 30 sec, 1 minute). If he stands up or jumps at you, say "no" and repeat the command. If you can't get his attention, raise the food bowl to the level just below your face. A little patience will go a long way. Don't expect results immediately.

It's always best to say his name first and once he is looking at you, give him the command.

Try the garbage bin with a latch, or the heavy metal one.
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Old 09-21-2012, 11:11 PM   #3
Soulofpostar

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Your best bet is to just keep human food away from him entirely. Put your trash can in the closet or switch to a small one that goes under your kitchen sink, for example. If that's not possible, there are ones with lid latches as well, that even if he knocks it over, it won't spill out. Put up a baby gate while you're putting food on the table to keep him away from it completely, or make that the time you let him out into the backyard for playtime. As it stands now, despite you saying no, he knows he can get it if he wants it.

Something that works for us to prevent begging is to feed ours at the same time we eat. He won't stay eating the entire time we are, of course, as he wolfs down his food super fast, but it gets us started and he loses interest in what we're doing because nobody is paying any attention to him. Giving him a bone or something to distract him during that time is helpful, too, as it keeps him busy and less interested in the table.
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Old 09-21-2012, 11:33 PM   #4
jinnsamys

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I had a golden retriever for 11 years, and I can say there is no way to do so unless you take him to a dog trainer os some kind! We tried everything with my dog, but every opportunity she got she would eat out of the trash or jump up and eat off the table or counter. Literally, EVERY opportunity. So from my own experience, I believe the only way is to go to a professional dog trainer.
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Old 09-22-2012, 04:08 AM   #5
strmini

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Default How do I get my dog to stop eating human food?
My dog can be a little bugger, he eats out of the garbage, he grabs food off the table if it is close enough to the edge, and nothing that I do seems to help. He just doesn't get the no begging rule, I have tried spraying him with water, putting him on time out in the kennel and just plain saying no. Nothing works. I am tired of fighting with him every time I put something in the garbage. Last night I had cleaned the kitchen and he managed to knock over the garbage and when I woke up in the morning, there was garbage every where. Is there anything that I can do to correct this? He is almost 10 years old and I am scared that it is too late to do anything. Any suggestions?
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Old 09-22-2012, 05:18 AM   #6
wrenjmerg

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One of our dogs came from a rescue centre and was completely antisocial when it came to human food. He had no inhibitions and would simply take what he wanted. He even tried taking food out of the children's mouths if give half a chance. The problem was that he simply didn't understand that he wasn't allowed to share and when he was told off he hadn't really a clue what he had done wrong. As far as he was concerned it was feeding time and up until living with us his eating method comprised of a free for all!

In the beginning we would shut him in a different room until we had finished eating where he would sulk until we let him out. Once we had finished eating he would get a treat of his own. Eventually I noticed that as soon as we were about to eat he would go and lie down in the other room as he knew that eventually he would get his treat and it didn't take him long to realise that there was a difference between our meal times and his. Hopefully, with a little patience, your dog will realise what is and isn't acceptable.

On a more practical level you need to remove the temptation out of his way! Don't allow him in the kitchen when you are cooking or eating and if possible move the kitchen bin altogether. I actually don't use a kitchen bin any more because no matter how well behaved our dog is now he still can't resist the smell of kitchen waste and will happily throw it all over the room!

Good luck!
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