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Old 08-28-2012, 10:08 PM   #1
uwJzsM8t

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Is there much market for coffee/hot drinks in Canada? If so, I am probably gonna move to Calgary and open a coffee shop.
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:24 PM   #2
Grapappytek

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No, seriously not at all. We have the american starbucks saturation, but that's undercut by the WAY more popular tim hortons line. Opening a coffee shop only works if you have a niche - there's a place in ottawa called Wags that does this - you're allowed to bring dogs in and they sell doggy d rinks and snacks too.

But a plain coffee shop you have no chance.
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:30 PM   #3
Hmntezmb

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Oh.

Then what would be a good buisiness to open there that costs equal to or less than 500,000 USD?
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:53 PM   #4
sjdflghd

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Oh.

Then what would be a good buisiness to open there that costs equal to or less than 500,000 USD?
Marry me!

... that's not at all a little awkward.

If you opened a coffee shop in Vancouver B.C. (Alberta is a wasteland), I'd love you forever. But to be honest, that's just because I love coffee. I probably would just opt to brew my own coffee instead of making the trek to visit daily.

Opening a retail store, or food / coffee place seems a bit problematic; without doing any research (something that should be done before recommending for / against something, so keep that in mind), I can tell you that, like in the US, major brands are extremely popular here. Whether we're talking Tim Hortons, which has become synonymous with Canadian culture, Denny's, which is a plague upon our nation for their bad food but 24/7 service, or Subway, which rules the sandwich shop industry with an iron fist, it's very difficult to undercut them without catering to individuals with location (convenience being the major selling point).

Every morning, as I go to work, Tim Hortons is packed full of hungry / under-caffeinated Canadians looking for their fix...

Do you have a business model planned? Were you just looking to acquire another business and utilize their current model (fixing / changing it as needed)? I'm sure there are plenty of resources you can look up online to do research that isn't a Yugioh message board.
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:58 PM   #5
RBJamez

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I do have a business model planned, but now I see that a coffee shop in Canada will be no good.

Visit me in New Zealand or Denmark or Singapore (whichever I choose) In 15 years!
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:59 PM   #6
Nopayof

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DOuble Post:
So no ideas? None at all?
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Old 08-28-2012, 11:03 PM   #7
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Good luck competing against Tim Horton's. They've even started taking down Coffee Time here. The only Starbucks near me is connected to Chapters for readers/little meetings. Since Tim Horton's changed their cups; a large [or extra large?] double double coffee is $2 flat. I don't drink coffee and even I know that for some reason.

...Though I can't take this seriously in all honesty.
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Old 08-28-2012, 11:03 PM   #8
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I do have a business model planned, but now I see that a coffee shop in Canada will be no good.

Visit me in New Zealand or Denmark or Singapore (whichever I choose) In 15 years!
I disagree.

The fact that you weren't aware of your major competitors implies that you did not do the adequate level of research needed to "have a business model planned". In fact, it implies your business model is either still being developed (and you were excited to tell us, the community in which you are active) the news, or just very poorly planned out.

No offense is meant towards you in this.
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Old 08-29-2012, 01:04 PM   #9
itsmycock

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also why calgary seriously
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:39 PM   #10
wllsqyuipknczx

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Cuz I dont like Toronto and Calgary is pretty IMO.

What the,n, Crad, would you suggest i do to combat the chains?
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:57 PM   #11
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Dont hate on Toronto - Calgary is redneck biblebelt ville in canada, thats why i'd stay away - Maybe scout out Ottawa or Vancouver if you hate Toronto.

Ottawa you might be able to get footing if you ccan find a niche, as said. Other than that find places with hipster-ish arts schools, and then make yourself unique as said
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Old 08-29-2012, 05:12 PM   #12
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my hometown is in the buckle of the South bible belt in America, and I'm completely redneck if I want to be.I guess I'll open the shop and my wife can work as well, and we'll scrape by lol
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:47 AM   #13
Galinastva

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Cuz I dont like Toronto and Calgary is pretty IMO.

What the,n, Crad, would you suggest i do to combat the chains?
Can't say; as I noted above, I'd need to do the proper research to figure out a plan. Focus on identifying a demand, either for a service or for a product, and build a model up from this. Most often when you're selling to consumers, convenience is extremely important. Make sure you're located in the right area to exploit this.

Unfortunately, if there's no demand, you're only going to bring in the curious crowd. Usually this isn't sustainable.

Dont hate on Toronto - Calgary is redneck biblebelt ville in canada, thats why i'd stay away - Maybe scout out Ottawa or Vancouver if you hate Toronto.

Ottawa you might be able to get footing if you ccan find a niche, as said. Other than that find places with hipster-ish arts schools, and then make yourself unique as said
I'd recommend Victoria (or other cities on the island) over Vancouver.
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Old 08-31-2012, 12:55 PM   #14
Extipletape

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Why Voctoria over 'Couver?
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:30 PM   #15
paydayus

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because old people? i dont know.
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:05 PM   #16
fuslssdfaa

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because old people? i dont know.
Because Vancouver is crazy, and owning a business in Victoria is far cheaper.
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